Jeff Johnston

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We are OK!  Our family is currently in Karuizawa, Japan attending an Asian Access retreat. Information is sketchy for us, but a major 9.1 earthquake has hit off the coast of Sendai, Japan about 3:00pm (JST). There has been a tsunami measuring 10 meters has also hit the coast.  Tsunami and...

Depressed man buries his head

In his upcoming Time article entitled "A Clouded Outlook," (August 2, 2010) Michael Schuman writes a sobering view of Japan's malaise and dismal economic outlook for the future. The 4-page article helps to see the big picture of the economic reality, which has been stagnant since the bubble burst in the early 1990s.

If you want a better understanding of Japan and the dynamics of turning this big ship around, read Shuman's article.

Here are a few excerpts to give you a sense of the problem:

"Today, Japan is an island of inertia in an Asia in constant flux. Japan's political leadership is paralyzed, its corporate elite befuddled, its people agonized about the future. While Asia lurches forward, Japan inches backward. And yet no one in Japan is doing very much about it."
Busy people crossing the street"Growth has been practically nonexistent, the welfare of the Japanese people has suffered and the old industrial titans of Japan Inc. are retreating on the world stage. Japan will likely lose its cherished status as the world's No.2 economy this year, to a more energetic China. Though that was inevitable, the fact that China is so quickly closing the gap in economic power doesn't bode well for Japan's standing in the world."
"Every few months, Tokyo's political revolving door spits out a new Prime Minister (Japan's had six PMs in the past four years) who inevitably vows that the time has come, finally, truly, to reform. But the proposals announced with expectant fanfare usually get swallowed up in Japan's dysfunctional political system."
Japan's cell phones are the most advanced in the world" 'There is an awareness that things can't stay the same,' says Jeffrey Kingston, director of Asian studies at Temple University's Japan campus. 'The problem is, people really don't know what is next. Japan's huge problems are just festering and Japan remains rudderless.' "

What makes Japan's story so much more frustrating is that not so long ago, the nation was at the forefront of change. Long before Apple's iPad, it was Japan's Sony that invented the must-have gadgets that changed global lifestyles (remember the Walkman?). Japan didn't need answers; Japan was the answer. Yet those same policies and practices that sparked Japan's miracle have come to strangle it.

High school students in TokyoThere is much more detail in the article, including what current PM Naoto Kan is trying to do, the downside of consensus-based decision-making, the economic effect on the younger people, potential implications on taxes and immigration policy, and much more.

What needs to be done to change this dilemma? Schuman with the help of fellow reporter Terrence Terashima offer recommendations. I'll let you read them, if you're interested, but Schuman closes with this pessimistic summation:

"Such a sweeping vision for the nation's future and its role in the world is regrettably absent. Katsuji Konno, president of Igeta Tea Manufacturing, a Sendai-based chain of specialty tea shops, complains that the country's leaders are too focused on short-term fixes rather than long-term solutions. 'You have to think of more drastic measures,' he says. 'You need to think 10, 30, 40 years ahead.' Until Japan stops living in the past, it may not have a future."

Allow me to make a personal comment here after tracking the news and talking with my Japanese friends. . .

Japan's businesses are strugglingWhat is painfully obvious in Japan is that things are going to get worse—not better—at least for the foreseeable future. Japanese will need to adjust their lifestyle accordingly. No more can the people of Japan put their faith in their government to do what is best in their long-term future.

Young Tokyo woman sits and reflectsAs a missionary here, who has seen countless Japanese shy away from following Christ, I can only hope—and pray—that this growing economic challenge swings wide open the door in people's lives for the Gospel. Up until now, they've simply been too comfortable.

While I'd like to see Japan flourish, its own affluence has become a huge stumbling block for the Gospel. And God loves the Japanese too much. I trust He will use this difficulty to compel many to follow Him.

     Church with a blue sky and only a few clouds

They say that every cloud has a silver lining. Maybe the spiritual outlook is not so clouded after all.

What do you think?

Asian Access will not be attending Urbana for the first time we can remember.  There are a number of reasons for this tough decision, but we wanted to make sure that everyone knows that we're still sending short-termers to Japan.

Urbana '09 logo

Join us in praying for Urbana '09, that God would use it to call thousands of young people into missions.  We wish those organizations represented at Urbana well as they strive to find necessary workers for their ministries.

And pray also that Asian Access would find more workers to help us achieve our bold 2020 Vision for Japan:

Asian Access/Japan seeks to deploy 100 church multiplication teams:

  • To establish 1,000 reproducing congregations
  • which will enfold 1 million new followers of Christ,
  • who will in turn send 1,000 missionaries from Japan to the cities of Asia, that will be home to
  • 1 billion people by the year 2020 AD.


More information...


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If someone says "missions is about cramming Christianity down other people's throats," how would you respond?  Tell us!

Recently, a facebook friend of mine who is a pastor shared a status update about his daughter attending a missionary training program before heading to Asia for a short-term missions assignment.

Most of the comments from his friends were, as you could imagine, extremely positive, optimistic, and prayerful.

However, one friend wrote this bold question:

Mission service.....is that when u go to another country and offer to assist if the people are willing to have christianity forced down their throats?

My pastor friend eloquently offered a graciously tender-hearted reply saying that the heart of missions is sharing the message of hope of Jesus Christ, often demonstrated through mercy and service.

Here's what I added to the conversation:

Ouch! Yet you raise an interesting and sometimes legitimate critique of missions. Thank you for being bold enough to spark this dialogue.

If you have a half hour, I invite you to watch a mini-documentary "MISSIONS: REDEFINED" that I helped to produce. My team examined missions in three Asian countries (Japan, Sri Lanka and Mongolia). Sri Lanka has had to deal with colonialist-style missions in their past where well-meaning missionaries brought some baggage along with the Gospel. In the documentary, we examined what missions means at this time in history. I think you (and the others here) might find it rather interesting.

You can watch it online here:
http://asianaccess.org/video/index-missions-redefined.html


Ok, so what about you?  What would you say?  Let's collect some responses.  Please leave your replies here...

 


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Working in concert for greater fruitfulness in Japan

Coach Leader Summit 2010 - working groupAsian Access' tagline is "Developing Leaders. Multiplying Churches." At our core, that's what we're about. Each statement represents a key objective in our ministry across Asia. Both are centrally important to what we're trying to achieve toward extending the kingdom of God.

Today and tomorrow in Tokyo, Asian Access' "JCGI Network" in Japan is holding its first ever "Coach Leader Summit" to try to do both of these fundamental tasks hand-in-hand and thus better.

For many years, JCGI has been effectively running two types of regional networks in Japan: 1) Leadership Development Networks and 2) Church Planting Networks. These two ongoing networks have specialized, focusing intently on their own objective—either of training pastors or of fostering church multiplication. The leaders of these networks serve as coaches and facilitators. Coaches in each type of network have gathered independently to pray for God's blessing, report on progress, and plan for future networks.

Rev. Jiro Chida shares about updates in the networks he is coaching.

What's different now?

Rev. Hiroshi Kawasaki, Director of JCGI NetworkUnder the direction of Rev. Hiroshi Kawasaki, JCGI Network decided to strategically realign its efforts to work more synergistically. For the first time, 21 pastoral leaders and 3 missionaries in both types of networks are meeting for a combined two-day "Coach Leader Summit," asking some key questions:

  1. What is needed to make our leadership development networks and our church planting networks more effective?
  2. How can these two types of networks cooperate and collaborate together for even greater fruitfulness?
  3. How can we get more Japanese churches involved in our networks?
  4. What changes do we need to implement to ensure these above objectives happen?

This summit is currently underway (July 26-27, 2010). Will you join us in prayer that God inspires this group of leaders to join efforts and work in better concert with one another? Pray that God will use these networks to develop even more leaders and foster a church multiplication movement in Japan.

Coach Leader Summit 2010 - group photo


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